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1. Introduction

In this quick tutorial, we’ll explore two different ways to disable database auto-configuration in Spring Boot. This can come in handy when testing.

We’ll illustrate examples for Redis, MongoDB, and Spring Data JPA.

We’ll start by looking at the annotation-based approach, and then we’ll look at the property file approach.

2. Disable Using Annotation

Let’s start with the MongoDB example. We’ll look at classes that need to be excluded:

@SpringBootApplication(exclude = {
    MongoAutoConfiguration.class, 
    MongoDataAutoConfiguration.class
})

Similarly, we’ll look at disabling auto-configuration for Redis:

@SpringBootApplication(exclude = {
    RedisAutoConfiguration.class, 
    RedisRepositoryAutoConfiguration.class
})

Finally, we’ll look at disabling auto-configuration for Spring Data JPA:

@SpringBootApplication(exclude = {
    DataSourceAutoConfiguration.class, 
    DataSourceTransactionManagerAutoConfiguration.class, 
    HibernateJpaAutoConfiguration.class
})

3. Disable Using Property File

We can also disable auto-configuration using the property file.

We’ll first explore it with MongoDB:

spring.autoconfigure.exclude= \
  org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.mongo.MongoAutoConfiguration, \
  org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.data.mongo.MongoDataAutoConfiguration

Now we’ll disable it for Redis:

spring.autoconfigure.exclude= \
  org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.data.redis.RedisAutoConfiguration, \
  org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.data.redis.RedisRepositoriesAutoConfiguration

Finally, we’ll disable it for Spring Data JPA:

spring.autoconfigure.exclude= \ 
  org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.jdbc.DataSourceAutoConfiguration, \
  org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.orm.jpa.HibernateJpaAutoConfiguration, \
  org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.jdbc.DataSourceTransactionManagerAutoConfiguration

4. Testing

For testing, we’ll check that the Spring beans for the auto-configured classes are absent in our application context.

We’ll start with the test for MongoDB. We’ll verify if the MongoTemplate bean is absent:

@Test(expected = NoSuchBeanDefinitionException.class)
public void givenAutoConfigDisabled_whenStarting_thenNoAutoconfiguredBeansInContext() { 
    context.getBean(MongoTemplate.class); 
}

Now we’ll check for JPA. For JPA, the DataSource bean will be absent:

@Test(expected = NoSuchBeanDefinitionException.class)
public void givenAutoConfigDisabled_whenStarting_thenNoAutoconfiguredBeansInContext() {
    context.getBean(DataSource.class);
}

Finally, for Redis, we’ll check the RedisTemplate bean in our application context:

@Test(expected = NoSuchBeanDefinitionException.class)
public void givenAutoConfigDisabled_whenStarting_thenNoAutoconfiguredBeansInContext() {
    context.getBean(RedisTemplate.class);
}

5. Conclusion

In this brief article, we learned how to disable Spring Boot auto-configuration for different databases.

The source code for all the examples in this article is available over on GitHub.

Course – LSD (cat=Persistence)

Get started with Spring Data JPA through the reference Learn Spring Data JPA course:

>> CHECK OUT THE COURSE
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