1. Overview

In this tutorial, we’ll discuss two variants of virtual local area networks (VLAN): standard and extended VLAN.

Furthermore, we’ll present the core differences between them.

2. Introduction to VLAN

A virtual local area network (VLAN) is a technology that allows the segmentation of a physical network into multiple logical networks. Additionally, we can do the segmentation by tagging packets with a VLAN ID, which identifies the VLAN to which the packet belongs.

Segmentation allows for creating multiple virtual networks on a single physical network infrastructure. Furthermore, it helps to separate different types of network traffic, such as data, voice, and video. Additionally, we can segment a network into different security zones.

Moreover, VLANs are typically created and configured through a network switch. Additionally, we can use them to improve network security, performance, and manageability.

Furthermore, there’re five popular variants of VLAN: standard, extended, port-based, protocol-based, and management VLAN. We’ll discuss standard and extended VLAN in detail.

3. Standard VLAN

3.1. Introduction to Standard VLAN

A standard VLAN is a type of VLAN used to segment a network into smaller, more manageable subnets. Additionally, we use it to separate different types of network traffic, such as data, voice, and video.

Let’s take a look at the architecture of the standard VLAN:

standard VLAN

We commonly use standard VLANs in enterprise networks to segment the network into smaller, more manageable subnets. Additionally, we can utilize them to segment a network into different security zones, separate different types of network traffic, and isolate departmental traffic.

Furthermore, standard VLANs can also be useful in environments like educational institutions, government organizations, and healthcare facilities.

3.2. Advantages and Disadvantages

Let’s talk about some advantages and disadvantages of the standard VLAN.

Some advantages of standard VLAN include improved network security, efficient network performance, and enhanced network manageability.

Segmenting a network into different VLANs makes it more difficult for unauthorized users to access sensitive information or resources. Furthermore, separating different types of network traffic into different VLANs can reduce congestion and improve overall network performance. Finally, creating smaller, more manageable subnets makes troubleshooting and managing the network more accessible.

Although standard VLAN offers a wide range of advantages, it also has some disadvantages. Some crucial issues are increased complexity, hardware cost, and limitation in scalability.

As the number of VLANs increases, managing and troubleshooting the network can become more complex. Furthermore, implementing VLANs typically requires using VLAN-aware networking devices, such as switches, which can be more expensive than traditional networking devices. Additionally, standard VLANs are limited to a maximum of 1005 VLANs per network, which can be a problem in large networks.

Finally, it’s worth noting that the disadvantages are not so significant if the network is appropriately designed and managed. Therefore, the benefits of using VLANs typically outweigh the drawbacks.

4. Extended VLAN

4.1. Introduction to Extended VLAN

An extended VLAN allows advanced network segmentation. Additionally, it’s also known as VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP). Furthermore, using an extended VLAN, we can create multiple subnets within a single VLAN. We call these subnets VLAN Sub-interfaces. Additionally, they provide more granular control over the network.

An extended VLAN is typically created through a VTP-enabled switch. VTP switch, also called VTP client, enables the management and configuration of multiple VLANs across multiple switches. Additionally, VTP permits the creation, modification, and deletion of VLANs on all switches within a VTP domain. Furthermore, VLANs numbered from 1006 to 4094 are considered extended VLANs.

Let’s take a look at the general network architecture of an extended VLAN:

extended VLAN

We can use extended VLANs in large enterprise networks where more advanced segmentation is needed. Additionally, we can use them to implement advanced features like the quality of service (QoS) and Virtual Private LAN Service (VPLS).

4.2. Advantages and Disadvantages

We know the basic architecture and usage of an extended VLAN. Now let’s explore the advantages and disadvantages of it.

An extended VLAN offers several advantages, including increased scalability, greater flexibility, support for advanced features, and enhancement in security.

Extended VLANs can support a larger number of VLANs, which allows for more advanced segmentation of an extensive network. Furthermore, extended VLANs make it possible to create multiple subnets within a single VLAN. Hence, it provides easy management and better control of the network.

It includes advanced network features which can improve the overall network performance and capabilities. Additionally, it can help to enhance security by limiting access to sensitive information or resources.

Now let’s talk about some disadvantages of extended VLAN. The ability to create multiple subnets within a single VLAN can make the network more complex if the number of subnets is more.

Furthermore, implementing extended VLANs typically requires VTP-enabled switches. However, VTP-enabled switches are more expensive than traditional networking devices. Additionally, VTP is vulnerable to VTP attacks. A malicious user can inject VLAN information into a network. Furthermore, the user can modify the existing VLANs, leading to network downtime or security breaches.

5. Differences

Let’s take a look at the core differences between standard and extended VLANs:

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6. Conclusion

In this tutorial, we discussed two variants of virtual local area networks (VLAN): standard and extended VLAN. Furthermore, we presented the core differences between them.

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