Spring with Maven

Table of Contents

  1. Overview
  2. Basic Spring Dependencies with Maven
  3. Spring Persistence with Maven
  4. Spring MVC with Maven
  5. Spring Security with Maven
  6. Spring Test with Maven
  7. Using Milestones
  8. Using Snapshots
  9. Conclusion

1. Overview

This tutorial illustrates how to set up the Spring dependencies via Maven. The latest Spring releases can be found on Maven Central.

2. Basic Spring Dependencies with Maven

Spring is designed to be highly modular – using one part of Spring should not and does not require another. For example, the basic Spring Context can be without the Persistence or the MVC Spring libraries.

Let’s start with a very basic Maven setup which will only use the spring-context dependency:

<properties>
    <org.springframework.version>3.2.8.RELEASE</org.springframework.version>
    <!-- <org.springframework.version>4.0.2.RELEASE</org.springframework.version> -->
</properties>
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-context</artifactId>
    <version>${org.springframework.version}</version>
    <scope>runtime</scope>
</dependency>

This dependency – spring-context – defines the actual Spring Injection Container and has a small number of dependencies: spring-core, spring-expression, spring-aop and spring-beans. These augment the container by enabling support for some of the core Spring technologies: the Core Spring utilities, the Spring Expression Language (SpEL), the Aspect Oriented Programming support and the JavaBeans mechanism.

Note the we’re defining the dependency in the runtime scope – this will make sure that there are no compile time dependencies on any Spring specific APIs. For more advanced usecases, the runtime scope may be removed from some selected Spring dependencies, but for simpler projects, there is no need to compile against Spring to make full use of the framework.

Also note that, starting with Spring 3.2, there is no need to define the CGLIB dependnecy (now upgraded to CGLIB 3.0) – it has been repackaged (the all net.sf.cglib package is now org.springframework.cglib) and inlined directly within the spring-core JAR (see the JIRA for additional details).

3. Spring Persistence with Maven

Let’s now look at the persistence Spring dependencies – mainly spring-orm:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-orm</artifactId>
    <version>${org.springframework.version}</version>
</dependency>

This comes with Hibernate and JPA support – such as HibernateTemplate and JpaTemplate – as well as the a few additional, persistence related dependencies: spring-jdbc and spring-tx.

The JDBC Data Access library defines the Spring JDBC support as well as the JdbcTemplate, and spring-tx represents the extremely flexible Transaction Management Abstraction.

4. Spring MVC with Maven

To use the Spring Web and Servlet support, there are two dependencies that need to be included in the pom, again in addition to the core dependencies from above:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-web</artifactId>
    <version>${org.springframework.version}</version>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-webmvc</artifactId>
    <version>${org.springframework.version}</version>
</dependency>

The spring-web dependency contains common web specific utilities for both Servlet and Portlet environments, while spring-webmvc enables the MVC support for Servlet environments.

Since spring-webmvc has spring-web as a dependency, explicitly defining spring-web is not required when using spring-webmvc.

5. Spring Security with Maven

Security Maven dependencies are discussed in depth in the Spring Security with Maven article.

6. Spring Test with Maven

The Spring Test Framework can be included in the project via the following dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-test</artifactId>
    <version>${spring.version}</version>
    <scope>test</scope>
</dependency>

As of Spring 3.2, the Spring MVC Test project, which started as a standalone project available on github, has been included into the core Test Framework – and so including the spring-test dependency is enough.

Note that for older applications still on Spring 3.1 and below, the older standalone Maven dependency still exists and can be used for almost identical results. The dependency is not on Maven Central however, so using it will require adding a custom repository to the pom of the project.

7. Using Milestones

The release version of Spring are hosted on Maven Central. However, if a project needs to use milestone versions, then a custom Spring repository needs to be added to the pom:

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>repository.springframework.maven.milestone</id>
        <name>Spring Framework Maven Milestone Repository</name>
        <url>http://repo.spring.io/milestone/</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

One this repository has been defined, the project can define dependencies such as:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-core</artifactId>
    <version>3.2.0.RC2</version>
</dependency>

8. Using Snapshots

Similar to milestons, snapshots are hosted in a custom repository:

<repositories>
    <repository>
        <id>repository.springframework.maven.snapshot</id>
        <name>Spring Framework Maven Snapshot Repository</name>
        <url>http://repo.spring.io/snapshot/</url>
    </repository>
</repositories>

Once the SNAPSHOT repository is enabled in the pom, the following dependencies can be referenced:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-core</artifactId>
    <version>3.3.0.BUILD-SNAPSHOT</version>
</dependency>

As well as – for 4.x:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-core</artifactId>
    <version>4.0.3.BUILD-SNAPSHOT</version>
</dependency>

9. Conclusion

This article discusses the practical details of using Spring with Maven. The Maven dependencies presented here are of course some of the major ones, and there are several others that may be worth mentioning and have not yet made the cut. Nevertheless this should be a good starting point for using Spring in a project.

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  • Dominik Drzewiecki

    When transitive dependencies’ version resolved by maven does not suit you for some reason, as described in 5.2, (In this particular case, you know better that it is spring-jdbc-3.2.2.RELEASE.jar that should be used), it is much better to declare transitive dependencies’ versions within “dependencyManagement” section rather than in “dependencies”, unless you use this very artifact explicitly (e.g. it is required at compile-time).

    • baeldung

      Thanks for the feedback. This makes sense, especially when multiple projects are inheriting from the same parent. When that’s not the case, both options should be similar.

  • Carlos Barros

    what about I DONT WANNA USING FUKING MAVEN these guys are stupid forcing people to use this freaking heavy tool to build a helloworld application. Its about Spring not Maven. That idea of putting maven at all projects its a stupid version of dumb nerds. WE DONT NEED MAVEN!