<

I just announced the newSpring Security 5 modules (primarily focused on OAuth2) in the course:

>> CHECK OUT LEARN SPRING SECURITY

1. Overview

In this quick article, we’ll focus on how to programmatically set an authenticated user in Spring Security and Spring MVC.

2. Spring Security

Simply put, Spring Security hold the principal information of each authenticated user in a ThreadLocal – represented as an Authentication object.

In order to construct and set this Authentication object – we need to use the same approach Spring Security typically uses to build the object on a standard authentication.

To, let’s manually trigger an authentication and then set the resulting Authentication object into the current SecurityContext used by the framework to hold the currently logged-in user:

UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken authReq
 = new UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken(user, pass);
Authentication auth = authManager.authenticate(authReq);
SecurityContext sc = SecurityContextHolder.getContext();
securityContext.setAuthentication(auth);

After setting the Authentication in the context, we’ll now be able to check if the current user is authenticated – using securityContext.getAuthentication().isAuthenticated().

3. Spring MVC

By default, Spring Security adds an additional filter in the Spring Security filter chain – which is capable of persisting the Security Context (SecurityContextPersistenceFilter class).

In turn, it delegates the persistence of the Security Context to an instance of SecurityContextRepository, defaulting to the HttpSessionSecurityContextRepository class.

So, in order to set the authentication on the request and hence, make it available for all subsequent requests from the client, we need to manually set the SecurityContext containing the Authentication in the HTTP session:

public void login(HttpServletRequest req, String user, String pass) { 
    UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken authReq
      = new UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken(user, pass);
    Authentication auth = authManager.authenticate(authReq);
    
    SecurityContext sc = SecurityContextHolder.getContext();
    sc.setAuthentication(auth);
    HttpSession session = req.getSession(true);
    session.setAttribute(SPRING_SECURITY_CONTEXT_KEY, sc);
}

SPRING_SECURITY_CONTEXT_KEY is a statically imported HttpSessionSecurityContextRepository.SPRING_SECURITY_CONTEXT_KEY.

It should be noted that we can’t directly use the HttpSessionSecurityContextRepository – because it works in conjunction with the SecurityContextPersistenceFilter.

That is because the filter uses the repository in order to load and store the security context before and after the execution of the rest of defined filters in the chain, but it uses a custom wrapper over the response which is passed to the chain.

So in this case, you should know the class type of the wrapper used and pass it to the appropriate save method in the repository.

4. Conclusion

In this quick tutorial, we went over how to manually set the user Authentication in the Spring Security context and how it can be made available for Spring MVC purposes, focusing on the code samples that illustrate the simplest way to achieve it.

As always, code samples can be found over on GitHub.

I just announced the new Spring Security 5 modules (primarily focused on OAuth2) in the course:

>> CHECK OUT LEARN SPRING SECURITY

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
bee
Guest
bee

What do I need to do to get the “authManager” ?

Loredana Crusoveanu
Editor

If you’re using Spring Boot, you can just autowire it:

@Autowired
AuthenticationManager authenticationManager;

If not, you’ll have to define it as a bean. In Java config, this would look something like:

@Bean
@Override
public AuthenticationManager authenticationManagerBean() throws Exception {
return super.authenticationManagerBean();
}