The Price of all “Learn Spring Security” course packages will permanently increase by $50 on the 8th of December:

>>> GET ACCESS NOW


The adoption numbers in the Java IDE ecosystem have always been interesting to watch.

So, this year, when I ran the regular Java and Spring survey, I decided to include the IDE question:

What is your main IDE?

And 2255 responses later – here’s what the market share looks like for the major players:

It definitely is a tight race between Eclipse in IntelliJ – both of them effectively hold about half of the market.

What’s even more interesting is understanding these numbers in the context of the ZeroTurnaround 2014 survey – which had a similar sample size – 2164 answers.

The 2014 data has Eclipse at a slightly higher market share – 52%, and IntelliJ at only 33% of market.

The trend is clear – Eclipse has been slowly shedding users, and IntelliJ IDEA has been picking up these users as well as a good chunk of the Netbeans and other numbers.

The Price of all “Learn Spring Security” course packages will permanently increase by $50 on the 8th of December:

>>> GET ACCESS NOW

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Smith John
Guest

I love netbeans

Eugen Paraschiv
Guest

That’s very cool – 6% is still quite a large number of users if you consider the size of the market.

Walter Nyland
Guest

“…the regular Java and Spring survey…” — never heard of it… Not sure what these statistics mean, maybe only that these apply to those who heard of it, apparently in the Spring community?

Eugen Paraschiv
Guest
Hey Walter, First – I’ve been running the survey for a few years now. It’s not the industry standard survey or anything like that, but 2200 people is a decent sample size (similar to the ZeroTurnaround sample size of 2014 for example). Now, I’m not quite sure what you mean in the second part of the comment? If you mean that the audience of this survey was mostly Spring developers – yes, there is a bit of a bias there. But since the question was about IDEs, and while STS is Eclipse, IntelliJ has top-notch Spring support as well –… Read more »
Walter Nyland
Guest

Yes, indeed. I am a NetBeans fan! So, you need to make very clear that the survey was amongst mostly Spring developers — and your survey is not about “adoption numbers in the Java IDE ecosystem”. Why not do the same survey amongst Java EE developers? Or JavaScript developers? Or at least be explicit about what the survey is actually focused on?

Eugen Paraschiv
Guest

And that’s fine – I don’t have anything against NetBeans 🙂
My contention is though that you have to make your argument as to why developers that are focused on Spring are going to produce skewed results. Again – both Eclipse and InteliJ have strong Spring support.
Are you saying that maybe NetBeans doesn’t? I’m not being facetious – I actually don’t know.
If that’s the case, than I can see why NetBeans would get lower numbers. Otherwise, I’m not sure how that makes any difference.

Walter Nyland
Guest

You’re asking why focusing on developers that are focused on one area of software development can’t be extrapolated to cover all other areas too?

Eugen Paraschiv
Guest
Hey Walter, So, what I was asking was – why would focusing on Spring, which is a concern that mostly should affect IDE usage – affect the IDE numbers? And now I have the answer – basically that NetBeans doesn’t have good support for Spring. No, I didn’t know what kind of Spring support NetBeans has – so it’s probably not that common knowledge for people not actually using it. But at least it’s a good answer as to why the numbers might be lower than the general market. Also, just to be clear – while the target audience of… Read more »
Walter Nyland
Guest

ZeroTurnaround, as well, has a self-selecting target. I.e., someone who doesn’t use Spring is unlikely to fill out your survey while someone who doesn’t use ZeroTurnaround is also unlikely to fill out their survey. In the case of your survey — did you approach the mailing lists around the IDEs you covered, was your survey promoted in the newsletters and other social media, e.g., Facebook, of those IDEs? My guess — the answer is “No.”

Eugen Paraschiv
Guest
Hey Walter, So, while I agree at a core level, that these targets are not 100% representative of the full market, you could say that about most things – and definitely about most surveys in this ecosystem. If StackOverflow runs a survey – well, that’s going to be biased towards people that spend time on StackOverflow. If the Java twitter account runs a survey – well, that’s developers that are on Twitter. My point is – as long as the sample size is large enough, and as long as the topic was about IDEs, which is mostly unrelated the audience… Read more »
Walter Nyland
Guest

You’ll then get totally different results next time because you’ll then get heaps of NetBeans, etc, users who are not using Spring and your results will be totally different.

Eugen Paraschiv
Guest

Sound good. But I do think we’ll have a closer confirmation that the numbers are valid – when ZeroTurnaround publish their new numbers.

Walter Nyland
Guest

So, you’re saying that if you were to do the survey amongst Java EE developers, you’d get exactly the same result as you did by doing it amongst Spring developers?

Walter Nyland
Guest

Indeed, NetBeans has much better support for Java EE than it does for Spring, that’s kind of common knowledge at this point, isn’t it?

Angelo
Guest

Intellij is really too expensive … no matter how good it is. Eclipse is still really messy … easy breaking what a shame . Disappointing oracle does not invest more in netbeans is really a good tool .

Eugen Paraschiv
Guest

Hey Angelo – that’s an interesting perspective. While I am am an Eclipse user, I don’t necessarily feel that IntelliJ is to expensive, mostly because I find it’s well worth paying for good tools that save me time. Also – the market seems to be moving in that direction, so people are clearly paying for it 🙂
But yes – I would like to see more focus on the Eclipse core, rather than all of these crazy projects that lead nowhere.
Cheers,
Eugen.

Vach
Guest
I’d pay 10 times more for intellij if i knew how good it is… and how fast they evolve it.. its like mac, yeah its expensive but i’d pay 10 times more for mac as well cos i spend majority of my time using those tools. Its not about price… Eclipse share you see there is a legacy, people dont invest their time to learn new tool while the old one works for them… pity they dont know how much time they would save… I dont know anyone who left intellij for eclipse… but i know a lot of people… Read more »
Aurel Avramescu
Guest

Well, I use the community edition, is having all I need.

Mariano Ruiz
Guest

I use IntelliJ, but for Java projects the difference in quality isn’t bigger (I used both IDEs in Spring and Play projects), specially if you take in care the license cost against a free license. However with dynamic platforms like Javascript, Groovy or Python, IDEA (or the other flavors like WebStorm, PyCharm…) makes a big difference against Eclipse. Also for the Grails framework (Groovy language but it’s a Java platform), IntelliJ does an excellent job, unlike Eclipse than even with an official plugin for that, it’s very unstable and consume a lot of resource.

Eugen Paraschiv
Guest

Yeah, that has been my experience as well. That’s why I’m primarily an Eclipse user right now.
However, the market trends are clear – IntelliJ is gaining solid ground.

wpDiscuz